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jamesdeenhateclub:

i think it’s important that myself and other white ppl remember that we can not even begin to truly understand the pain and trauma of what is happening in ferguson, nor can we grasp the anger and sadness black communities experience due to this situation. all we can do is stand in solidarity, listen, and not derail or take the focus away from the true face of racism and white supremacy.

(via tallgirlshaveshortmemories)

extendedburning:

you’re not a bad person if there are actual reasons why looking at ferguson stuff makes you terribly anxious or paranoid and im not going to fault you if you can’t. but, if you are humanly able, please reblog the posts on how to help, how to avoid tear gas, how to help pay for legal fees, the vigilsetc., and please, if you have the hd space, download and archive every video/picture of this you can, they are being taken off of social media. 

(Source: extendedburnings, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

Post!!

http://www.omaze.com/experiences/join-anson-mount-on-the-set-of-hell-on-wheels

Join Anson Mount on the Hell on Wheels film set!!

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

queenconsuelabananahammock:

wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler

She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”

While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.

She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).

“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!

BLACK EXCELLENCE

GO GIRL!!!!

There are many barriers left to be broken. We forget that…good job fantastic job. Now go be the one that finds our neighbors!!

(via tallgirlshaveshortmemories)